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Learning Something New Everyday

In-person learning is greatly limited nowadays. Before COVID-19, it was already on the decline, but with social distancing in full-swing, it is almost impossible to conduct/attend any form of in-person training. So how will job-seekers gain education for their career when they can't go train anywhere? Well with the tools of digital learning, continuing education doesn’t have to stop just because of limitation on where you can physically go. The online world hosts a zillion certification programs, trade skills, and even college degrees. With that being said, there is no time like the present to try to get more knowledge and skills under that belt of yours.

The Washington Post reported that more than 100,000 small businesses have shut down permanently since March. In July, ABC News announced that nearly 16,000 restaurants have closed permanently. Even though many businesses have been harshly impacted, there are still employers looking for workers, primarily in the skilled trades and technology. Many of these trade skills need some sort of experience or training to even be qualified for them, but in many cases, that can be acquired through online learning, as opposed to in-person training or classes. It really is an extraordinary world that we live in today. Technology has made our lives more complex, but at the same time, it has given people chances they would never have had before. We at Supplemental Staffing want to see everyone succeed, and utilizing the plethora of knowledge available at your fingertips can certainly help you get there.

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Topics: Re-Entering the Workforce, Resume, Training, Skilled Trades

Stress in this Time of Uncertainty

There are many recent events that have upset our world, along with the social distancing recommendations and many who have lost their jobs because of businesses closing. Others are working from home and families are trying to establish routines for children and distance learning. There is a lot of uncertainty, in our own lives and in society. And then there is the isolation. Humans are social; we like being with others and having freedom of movement. We are averse to change, finding comfort in our routines and our normal lives. As a result, this isolation and changes are overwhelming and stressful.

Everyone responds to stress differently, but older people and those with underlying conditions which make them more susceptible, are likely to respond more strongly to the situation. Children also have stronger adverse reactions to stress, as they do not always understand the implications of what is going on and may start to exhibit behavioral changes.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Changing Jobs, Managing Stress, Work-Life Balance, High-Stress

A Safe Return

Even in tough times, you must persevere to succeed. When starting a new job position or returning to your previous in-person roll, you should take an extra step of caution for yourself, co-workers, loved ones, and the community.

In this tenuous situation, there are many questions employers and employees should be asking. We have compiled a few of the common ones to ask:

Employer questions:

  • Have you been exposed to anyone who has or may have COVID-19?
  • Are you caring for anyone with the virus?
  • Do you have childcare needs covered?
  • Do you have a fever of over 100.4⁰ F or 38⁰ C? (This may be asked of you each day.)
  • Are you experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms?
  • Do you have any pre-existing conditions that make you more susceptible to the virus?
  • Is your normal mode of transportation available and do you feel it is safe for you to use it?
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Topics: Safety, COVID19

Top 8 Characteristics of Good Leadership

Last week we asked if you should want to be a leader.

This week, we’ll look at how to be a good leader, regardless of your actual leadership role or title. 

Anyone can be a leader. The best, work at developing their skills and adopt the characteristics of other quality leaders. The easiest way to do this is to observe several leaders you admireObservation may include following them on social media, reading their books, and attending or downloading any speeches they have given. Watch what they do and how they do it, then incorporate the traits you admire into your own leadership style. 

Next, realize that leadership isn’t just a “top of the ranks” role. The greatest leaders can – and will – work alongside those they are tasked with leading. Leadership is about setting an example. No task is beneath you. You shouldn’t ask others to do anything you wouldn’t be willing to do yourself. 

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Gaining Experience, Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress, Leaving a Job, Work-Life Balance

Should you want to be a leader?

The answer to that question is yes, but… and there’s always a “but.”

You may be thinking:

  • I’ve never been a leader so how do I know if I’ll like it or be good at it?
  • Does it mean more responsibility and am I ready for that?
  • Does it mean more money and is the money appropriate for the level of responsibility?
  • Does it mean I’ll have people who report to me and will I have to evaluate and discipline them, if necessary?
  • Does being a leader always mean I’m in charge – or could I lead in other ways?

Some people never actually consider these questions, so they are unprepared when thrusted into a leadership position.

That leadership position could be as a mentor, team leader, project leader, supervisor, manager, and the list goes on. There are many ways, and some of them don’t require the designation as a “leader.”

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Gaining Experience, Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress, Leaving a Job, Work-Life Balance

The Importance of Hiring During the COVID-19 Crisis

With COVID-19 threatening the populace, causing social distancing and shutdowns, now may not seem like the best time to look for new hires. However, essential businesses have essential positions that require staffing in order to keep functioning.

Let’s overcome our worries!

There are advantages to hiring now that many my not be thinking about. People still need jobs in these trying times and with the shutdown on non-essential businesses, the hiring pool is larger than normal. In that pool are plenty of skilled workers looking for a job. While other businesses may be afraid to hire, that leaves a great opportunity for you to hire those skilled workers for your own business.

There are excellent candidates who would like to move to a new position but are not actively looking because of all the downbeat news. To support both parties, Supplemental Staffing can still reach out to them for you. Whether you want to hire someone right now or take them on once the quarantine ends, here are 5 key tips that will enable whichever you decide.

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Topics: Temporary/Seasonal/Contract, Employment Agency, Hiring, COVID19

Tips for your stimulus check

Right now, many people are losing their income or maybe having a tough time finding a job to afford general living expenses. That’s a hard spot to be in. Luckily, there are still plenty of job opportunities to help keep you afloat and we have even had a few people find better, long-term jobs. Supplemental Staffing is actively looking for people to take on these open positions.

But let’s focus on reasonable tips to keep in mind while dealing with the funds received. We understand that not all options are feasible for everyone, but we wanted to share some general ideas.

PUT IT TOWARDS WHERE YOU NEED IT MOST:

  • If you do want to use it now – use it wisely. Some debt is being put on hold, like federal student loans, so take advantage of this opportunity to build up some savings or put it towards living expenses in this time of need. 
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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Employment Agency, Changing Jobs, Hiring, Weekly Pay, COVID19

Choosing and asking for a reference

You have got a good cover letter and resume and you now have an interview, but what are you going to do if they ask for a reference? You need to have your references ready, and aware that you are using them as references. Selecting the right people to provide a reference for you, and then asking them to be a reference, can be a daunting task. These individuals can make or break your job prospects, so you need to put as much thought into finding and asking them as you do the rest of your job-hunting process.

The first thing is to make a list of potential references who can speak about your work skills, past performance or character. Family members might give you a glowing reference, but potential employers are looking for professional references. Your list of potential references should include prior supervisors, co-workers or even clients. Next, you should think about your relationship with each of the people on your list. How long have you known them, how familiar are they with the work you have done in the past, how long has it been since you worked with them? What specific skill or character trait can they speak about if you ask them to be a reference? Also, you will want to think about what exactly the reference will say. You will want someone articulate enough to be able to explain what work you did for/with them and how well you did it. A note to remember, you do not have to select your prior boss. You can ask anyone you worked with who had the opportunity to see how you worked. After answering these questions, narrow down your reference list to three or four names.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Resume, Hiring, Interviewing, References

How to deal with a gap in employment?

It happens for any number of reasons and many people have it, but how exactly should you deal with a gap in employment? The first thing to remember is: be honest. Do not try to disguise the gap or lie about what you were doing when you were not working. Companies are scrupulous about checking references. The last thing you want to do is risk a potential job or start a new job with a lie. Lying on your resume, application, or as part of the hiring process is often a reason for dismissal at many companies.

You do not have to identify on your resume what you were doing during a gap in employment. Caring for a family member, relocating and trying to find a job in new city, taking time off to travel, or attempting to start your own business are all legitimate personal reasons to have a gap. Even though they do not need to be identified on your resume, you should be prepared to address them during an interview. You do not need to provide a bunch of personal details. Explain the situation, but do not include more than the basic facts. Then you need to explain how the situation is no longer a factor. Finally, you should reassure them of your interest and that you are ready to return to the workforce. Use the explanation as an opportunity to move the conversation to why you are particularly interested in the position and what you have to offer.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Volunteering, Re-Entering the Workforce, Gaining Experience, Changing Jobs, Interviewing

What to do if you are unhappy in your job?

This is the second of a two-part series on job happiness.  In last week's post, we took a look at the some of the warning signs that indicate you may be unhappy in your current position. This week, we will take a look at what to do if you find you are unhappy with your job.

One of the first warning signs we discussed is apathy. So, what should you do when you no longer care about the daily tasks or projects you are assigned, especially if it is a job you used to love? If you are in the apathy stage, now is the time to take a look at where you are and what you want out of a career or a position. You are older now than you were when you started this job and your interests and needs change over time. Take some time to think about what you are passionate about today, and what motivates you. From this vantage point, you will have a better understanding of what type of job or tasks will move you from apathy to enthusiasm. Then, you will want to see if you can adjust your responsibilities to focus on the things that do motivate you.

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Topics: Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress, Leaving a Job

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