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Customer Service Week, 2019

October 7th, 2019 begins Customer Service Week, a time to celebrate the great customer service you provide and an opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of it. Customer service isn’t just you and a buying customer. Even if you don’t have any contact with your company’s clients, or the general buying public, you still have customers. For example, the customers of the Human Resources department are fellow employees at the company. The customers on a factory line are the people at the next station down the line. The customers for the custodian are the people whose areas are cleaned.

We all have “customers” to serve, but how did it become this way and how do we serve them properly to get proper service back?

HISTORY

Customer Service Week is actually an international celebration. In 1992, the U.S. Congress proclaimed that it would be celebrated annually during the first full week in October. From the proclamation:

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Topics: Being a Great Employee, Customer Service Week

Burn-out: an 'occupational phenomenon'

Have you ever felt so tired of a job that you feel you just can’t take it anymore?

Burn-out is an ‘occupational phenomenon’ officially recognized by World Health Organization

We all get stressed in our jobs, but if this is happening every day, you may be experiencing the occupational phenomenon known as “burn-out.”

You’re not alone.

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced in May that it was including burn-out in its International Classification of Diseases.

WHO emphasizes that it is not an actual medical condition, but it could be a reason that people contact health providers.

They say that burn-out results from “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.”

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Topics: Health & Safety, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress

Just 2 hours a week in nature can work wonders

A new study says that spending two hours a week out in nature can work wonders for your health and wellbeing.

The study, led by the University of Exeter and published in Scientific Reports, found that “people who spend at least 120 minutes each week out in nature are more likely to say they have good health and a higher psychological wellbeing that those who don’t visit nature at all.”

And it didn’t matter if the 120 minutes was in one visit or in multiple shorter visits, it found.

“The current results also suggested that it did not matter how the 'threshold' was achieved. This may be because individuals selected exposures to fit their personal preferences and circumstances. For instance, some may prefer long walks on the weekend in locations further from home; while others may prefer regular shorter visits to parks in the local area,” the study says.

Other factors – such as gender, age, occupation, ethnicity, wealth, illness and disabilities – also did not matter. The 120 minutes applied to everyone in the study.

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Topics: Volunteering, Health & Safety, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress

How to Give Constructive Criticism

As hard as it is to hear that you’re doing something incorrectly or need to improve a behavior, being the person who has to tell you can be worse.

It’s called constructive criticism and learning how to give it correctly is important for everyone, and not just in a work environment.

Constructive criticism doesn’t just come from your boss or supervisor. You may need to give suggestions for improvement to your co-workers, especially if you’re responsible for mentoring a new employee or if a co-worker’s action is impacting your performance.

So, regardless of the situation, everyone should know how to give construction criticism. Here are some hints to help you do it well.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Being a Great Employee

Learning to Accept constructive criticism

No matter how much any of us tries, we all make mistakes. And even when we’re not making mistakes, we may have other flaws or negative mannerisms that impact our work. Invariably, this leads to someone trying to help us by pointing out the error of our ways.

That’s pretty much constructive criticism in a nutshell – and it’s constructive because the purpose is to help us improve.

If we truly want to improve, we must learn how to accept the constructive criticism and use it to better ourselves.

So how do we do that?

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Being a Great Employee

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