If you have questions about COVID-19 please refer to coronavirus.ohio.gov or michigan.gov/coronavirus and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act !

! Attention: Your 2019 W-2 is now available to view; simply click here !

HELPFUL RESOURCES

Recent Posts

What to do if you are unhappy in your job?

This is the second of a two-part series on job happiness.  In last week's post, we took a look at the some of the warning signs that indicate you may be unhappy in your current position. This week, we will take a look at what to do if you find you are unhappy with your job.

One of the first warning signs we discussed is apathy. So, what should you do when you no longer care about the daily tasks or projects you are assigned, especially if it is a job you used to love? If you are in the apathy stage, now is the time to take a look at where you are and what you want out of a career or a position. You are older now than you were when you started this job and your interests and needs change over time. Take some time to think about what you are passionate about today, and what motivates you. From this vantage point, you will have a better understanding of what type of job or tasks will move you from apathy to enthusiasm. Then, you will want to see if you can adjust your responsibilities to focus on the things that do motivate you.

Read More

Topics: Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress, Leaving a Job

Warning signs you are unhappy with your job

This is the first of a two-part series on job happiness. This week, we will look at some of the warning signs that indicate you may be unhappy with your current position. Next week, we will look at what to do about it if you find you are unhappy with your job. Sometimes, you know right away when you are ready for a change. But for others, their satisfaction with their position has slowly declined and they do not immediately realize how unhappy their position is making them. This post is meant to allow employees to recognize they may be unhappy, and maybe even help change their role on the job so that they can become a happier employee! Sometimes, people do not realize just how unhappy they are until someone points it out to them. In case you are one of those individuals, or you are just curious about how to tell when it is time for a change, or you are a supervisor who should be aware of your employees’ issues, here are some warning signs you can watch for.

Apathy

Apathy, not caring, lacking passion, unmotivated these are all ways to express a loss of interest in the daily job tasks. It could be that you see upcoming assignments as too simple, or you just do not care anymore about the tasks you have been assigned. Perhaps you look at your daily job to-do list and think it is like trudging along a rut you just cannot get out of. Or perhaps, you are present but not participating. You are doing just the minimum amount of work necessary, but no longer pitching in with conversations, other tasks, or helping co-workers. If you are numb to projects or tasks that used to excite you, you are probably in the apathy category.

Read More

Topics: Establishing a Career, Gaining Experience, Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress, Leaving a Job

Making productive to-do lists

Everyone makes lists – though not everyone does so in the same way. Whether you are the one who makes a list in their head of things to get at the grocery store, or the one who has to-do lists for every aspect of your life, these tips will help you be more productive and efficient in accomplishing the tasks on your list.

Use the right app or medium.

There are a many list apps you can get for your smart phone, and there is also a simple pen and paper.  The first thing you should do is decide which method of keeping track of your list(s) works best for you. Many apps allow you to add due dates, collaborate or share lists, and sort tasks. PC Magazine has list of the best to-do apps, or you can ask friends and relatives for suggestions. If you are a pen and paper type of person, the key to finding the best medium is to make sure it is a list you can easily see and refer to, and something you will not ignore. There are numerous options that include lined pages, calendars, and tabs for sorting lists. The best way to find the right one for you is to make a list (see what we did there?) of the key things you want and then do a google search for those items. Or just use a plain notebook and design your own.  The two most important things to remember are that it must work for you and be one you will actually use.

Read More

Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress

Tips for maintaining a good work-life balance

The term work-life balance as defined by BusinessDictionary is, “A comfortable state of equilibrium achieved between an employee’s primary priorities of their employment position and their private lifestyle,” and too often it is not achieved, especially in today’s technological world of 24/7 access to voicemail and email, but that does not mean you should not try. Studies show that people who do not have a good balance between work and personal life can be less productive and more stressed. Those who do have a good balance are usually more productive and tend to stay with their employer for a longer time. Here are some tips to help you find a balance between your working and non-working life.

Unplug

Unless you are a doctor or emergency responder who needs to be accessible every hour of the day, set aside some time to be away from your smart phone. There is no need to check emails while at your child’s baseball game, for example. Take some time to unwind and disconnect from the stresses of the rest of the world. Enjoy hobby, or some rest and relaxation, whatever it is that helps you get comfortable again.

Read More

Topics: Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress, Work-Life Balance

Tips For Being The New Employee

Most people are a “new” employee when they start a new job or make a career change. Temporary workers are the “new” employee each time they take a new assignment. In fact, as a temporary employee you could experience that new employee feeling several times in a month, depending on the types of assignments you take. Whether you are a new employee just once – or quite often – here are some tips to help you along the way.

Be Dependable

Being dependable means you show up on time, ready to work. Having the right tools and attire is important, but so is having the right attitude of enthusiasm for the tasks you are going to be performing.

Be Friendly

A smile goes a long way towards making a good impression, so remember to smile when seeing or meeting your co-workers. Introduce yourself to others during your breaks or lunches. Repeat their names when you meet to help you remember.

Show interest in others – which applies to life as well as a new job. Ask questions like ‘how long have you worked here?’ and ‘what do you like most about what you do?’ as a way to learn about others, as well as the company.

Read More

Topics: Re-Entering the Workforce, Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress

Burn-out: an 'occupational phenomenon'

Have you ever felt so tired of a job that you feel you just can’t take it anymore?

Burn-out is an ‘occupational phenomenon’ officially recognized by World Health Organization

We all get stressed in our jobs, but if this is happening every day, you may be experiencing the occupational phenomenon known as “burn-out.”

You’re not alone.

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced in May that it was including burn-out in its International Classification of Diseases.

WHO emphasizes that it is not an actual medical condition, but it could be a reason that people contact health providers.

They say that burn-out results from “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.”

Read More

Topics: Being a Great Employee, Safety, Managing Stress

Just 2 hours a week in nature can work wonders

A new study says that spending two hours a week out in nature can work wonders for your health and wellbeing.

The study, led by the University of Exeter and published in Scientific Reports, found that “people who spend at least 120 minutes each week out in nature are more likely to say they have good health and a higher psychological wellbeing that those who don’t visit nature at all.”

And it didn’t matter if the 120 minutes was in one visit or in multiple shorter visits, it found.

“The current results also suggested that it did not matter how the 'threshold' was achieved. This may be because individuals selected exposures to fit their personal preferences and circumstances. For instance, some may prefer long walks on the weekend in locations further from home; while others may prefer regular shorter visits to parks in the local area,” the study says.

Other factors – such as gender, age, occupation, ethnicity, wealth, illness and disabilities – also did not matter. The 120 minutes applied to everyone in the study.

Read More

Topics: Volunteering, Being a Great Employee, Safety, Managing Stress

How to Handle Stress as a Temporary Employee

Stress is often defined as the reaction a person has when a situation exceeds a person’s ability to handle it.

Mindy Shoss, an Associate Professor in Psychology at the University of Central Florida, says work-related stress “occurs when the demands on employees are greater than the resources the employees have to meet these demands.”

Basically, people become stressed when they think they don’t have control over a situation. Temporary employees, placed in a job only until a specific project is completed or only for a specific length of time, have even less control over their work environment and their work situations than other employees.

Plus, the nature of being a temporary employee with a temporary job could result in high job insecurity, one of the causes of work-related stress.

Not all stress is bad. Wanting to do a good job when you are first hired or working to meet a deadline or production target can be stressful, but the impact of that stress is driving you to perform better. It’s when the stress you’re experiencing is negatively impacting your work, health or home life that you need to worry.

Read More

Topics: Establishing a Career, Safety, Managing Stress

Top 4 Reasons To Keep A Clean Work Space

It finally feels like spring when the birds begin chirping, flowers blooming and the sun is out so our temperatures climb to appropriate levels.

It’s been pretty dreary with all the rain and wind, but now our thoughts are turning to that annual ritual known as Spring Cleaning. Did you know that spring cleaning isn’t just for the home? Your work space can benefit from it too!

There are a ton of reasons why it’s important to keep your work space clean and tidy, but here are the top four:

  1. Health:

    According to research, the average desk contains 400 times more germs than a toilet seat. That’s why cleaning your desk on a regular basis, not just in the spring, is a good idea if you and your co-workers want to stay healthy.

    Don’t have a desk? Non-office work-spaces can harbor germs as well, whether on the tools, the work space or in common eating areas. Even door handles or push plates can host a colony of germs just waiting to infect the next person who touches them.

    Regular daily cleaning and periodic deep cleaning will keep those germs at bay.

Read More

Topics: Preparing for an Interview, Safety, Managing Stress

Is the grass really greener? Things to consider before changing jobs

Everyone, at some point, will wonder if they should change jobs. It’s a normal feeling, whether you’re thinking about pay, opportunity or just doing something new.

If you’re a younger worker, you’re more like to actually change jobs than if you are an older worker well-established in your career.

Regardless of age, here are seven key things to consider before making that leap:
  1. Why do you want a change?

    Knowing why you’re not finding fulfillment in your current position and what things you’re looking for in a new one will help you get started in the process of switching jobs. Is it because you’re not being challenged? Are you seeking more money? Is it a bad work environment? Are there changes in the company, like mergers or financial issues, that you want to avoid?

    Whatever your reason, knowing why you’re looking to leave will help you avoid the same thing in a new position.

Read More

Topics: Establishing a Career, Preparing for an Interview, Changing Jobs, Managing Stress

Blog Archive Search

      Looking for additional help?

      YOU'LL FIND IT HERE.

      We post articles once a week on all kinds of things. Check out our posts and come back for new ones.

      Some things you can expect:

      • Tutorials that help you advance your career
      • Helping teach a program/skill
      • Why we enjoy helping our community
      • Our company's journey
      • And more!

      Recent Posts