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Recent Posts

Improving Communication Skills

Communication is absolutely vital, not just in the workplace but in life. Every interaction with someone involves some form of communication, even if nothing is verbally spoken. You need to be able to communicate to adequately express your ideas and plans on how to execute them.

Keys to Communication

First and foremost, the key to effective communication is to be clear and concise. The goal of communication is to make sure that your ideas are correctly understood. The best way to achieve that is to express them with as little room for confusion as possible. It is easier to engage with your audience when you do not waste their time and give them little opportunity to get distracted.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Preparing for an Interview, Being a Great Employee, Interviewing, Office Tips

How To Learn A New Skill

One of the best ways to expand your resume, excel at your job and improve as a person is to learn new skills. However, the prospect of spending the time and effort to attempt to learn a new skill can often seem daunting. It can become a much more reasonable task if you break it down into a few components that are easier to comprehend and then tackle. Using this guide as a frame of reference can help you get started growing your skillset and becoming a more well-rounded individual.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Gaining Experience

The Risks of Self-Managed Hiring

Any organization that seeks to expand and grow itself will eventually run into the issue of not having enough staff. While the solution is simple, hire more employees, the way to get there is more complicated than it seems. Numerous issues arise when attempting to manage the process of growing your team that you may not have considered.

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Topics: Preparing for an Interview, Temp-to-Hire, Employment Agency, Contract-to-Hire, Managing Stress, Interviewing, Human Resources, Office Tips

The Top 5 Reasons to Have a Mentor

January is National Mentoring Month, so it is a good time to look at the top five reasons to have a mentor, regardless of your job position.

But first, it is important to know several key points about having a mentor.

  • No matter where you are in your career path, you do not have to go it alone. There are always people who are willing to share their advice and help you along the way.
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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Gaining Experience, Resume, Being a Great Employee, Office Tips

Can working a Temp-to-Hire position benefit your career?

Trying a temp-to-hire job is like auditioning for a play. You can try out a role for a while, see if it fits you and makes sense, and if it doesn’t work, you can always change roles. You can learn some new skills, find new ways in which the abilities you already have can be applied, pick up new networking contacts, and maybe you can find a whole new career when you aren’t looking.

Because it has been such a challenging time for many people with employers forced to cut staffing due to COVID-19 shutdown requirements and more, it is difficult to find a job that you actually will enjoy. But it doesn't have to be hard! Is it time for a change in your career, yet you don’t know how your skills can apply to a different work line? Consider a temp-to-hire position. These are jobs where a company wants an employee to fill a vacancy, which leads to a full-time position. In the long-run, how can this benefit you? Is it worth contemplating?

Here are 5 things to keep in front of mind:

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Temp-to-Hire, Employment Agency, Gaining Experience, Contract-to-Hire, Resume, Changing Jobs

How to know you'll enjoy a job - 6 focuses to consider

Woo! Look at all the options on this job board! But there is a lot there, so how do you confirm a new job will be one that you will actually enjoy? Let's go through the six focuses to consider!

  1. It all starts with the job description.
    Read your job description carefully. It often tells you what type of company you'll find yourself doing. If it describes the new company or department as lively, energetic, with a big focus on teamwork, but you're shy, prefer working alone if possible, and want quiet, it may not be a good fit. If it appears too calm and you like intermingling with co-workers, it may not be the job for you.
  2. Take a look at where the job is located and consider your commute.
    Know the company's name, so you know exactly where the job is: is the position at headquarters or in a satellite/branch location.
    If your commute is 30-40 minutes or more, consider all issues before choosing this position, especially if the commute will be an hour or more. 
    Reconsider if you think a higher salary will compensate for that long commute.
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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Gaining Experience, Changing Jobs, Being a Great Employee, Managing Stress, Work-Life Balance

Updated Interview Etiquettes - In a world with Covid-19

With much of the closure restrictions lifted in many areas, companies are beginning to ramp back up. That means more interviews and new hires!

In the age of the COVID-19, much of the interview etiquette rules are changing. Here is what you should know:

  1. Depending on the type of job, inquire about a video interview.

While certain jobs are more likely to require in-person interviews, if it is a job where you may be working off-site or remotely, there is nothing wrong with asking about using video for the first interview. This is more likely to be granted if there are going to be multiple interviews before the position is offered to a candidate, or if stay-at-home orders are still in place.

But before asking for a video interview, be sure you have the proper equipment at home, along with the internet bandwidth and a professional setting in which to conduct the interview. It is never good to have the company say “sure” to your video interview only to have technical issues and kids or pets interrupting.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Changing Jobs, Hiring, Interviewing, COVID19

Making the most of your LinkedIn profile

When applying for a job, your potential employer will check references. What if they want to know more about who you are? It is likely they will check social media; which is why having a profile on LinkedIn can be a great tool to promote yourself.

LinkedIn bills itself as “the world’s largest professional network.” It is a platform that seeks to “connect the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful.” It was launched in 2003 and has been used by more than 706 million individuals for everything from finding a job to finding a provider of services.

Your LinkedIn profile is a wonderful place where you can tout your successes and show recommendations from colleagues, customers, or employers. Think of it as your online resume – plus it's interactive!

Just like your resume, there are tricks and tips to help you stand out among those 706 million users.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Social Media, Gaining Experience, Resume, Changing Jobs, Interviewing, References

Stress in this Time of Uncertainty

There are many recent events that have upset our world, along with the social distancing recommendations and many who have lost their jobs because of businesses closing. Others are working from home and families are trying to establish routines for children and distance learning. There is a lot of uncertainty, in our own lives and in society. And then there is the isolation. Humans are social; we like being with others and having freedom of movement. We are averse to change, finding comfort in our routines and our normal lives. As a result, this isolation and changes are overwhelming and stressful.

Everyone responds to stress differently, but older people and those with underlying conditions which make them more susceptible, are likely to respond more strongly to the situation. Children also have stronger adverse reactions to stress, as they do not always understand the implications of what is going on and may start to exhibit behavioral changes.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Changing Jobs, Managing Stress, Work-Life Balance, High-Stress

Choosing and asking for a reference

You have got a good cover letter and resume and you now have an interview, but what are you going to do if they ask for a reference? You need to have your references ready, and aware that you are using them as references. Selecting the right people to provide a reference for you, and then asking them to be a reference, can be a daunting task. These individuals can make or break your job prospects, so you need to put as much thought into finding and asking them as you do the rest of your job-hunting process.

The first thing is to make a list of potential references who can speak about your work skills, past performance or character. Family members might give you a glowing reference, but potential employers are looking for professional references. Your list of potential references should include prior supervisors, co-workers or even clients. Next, you should think about your relationship with each of the people on your list. How long have you known them, how familiar are they with the work you have done in the past, how long has it been since you worked with them? What specific skill or character trait can they speak about if you ask them to be a reference? Also, you will want to think about what exactly the reference will say. You will want someone articulate enough to be able to explain what work you did for/with them and how well you did it. A note to remember, you do not have to select your prior boss. You can ask anyone you worked with who had the opportunity to see how you worked. After answering these questions, narrow down your reference list to three or four names.

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Topics: Establishing a Career, Re-Entering the Workforce, Preparing for an Interview, Resume, Hiring, Interviewing, References